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szjoe

New Member
Mar 21, 2013
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#1
I'm from Europe, and more into F1, but have watched Nascar a few times briefly. Can someone explain the rules, to me it seemed they spent most of the time behind a safety car?
 

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Xun0401

New Member
Mar 25, 2013
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#2
I'm not too solid on the rules. However, they have plenty to regulations in order to ensure the safety of the drivers.

The most obvious rule is the roll cage of course. The other regulations involve the car specs. Each car must weigh 1565 kg (3450 lbs), have an FR drive train, and must be a 4 speed manual transmission. The engines are 5866 cc according to wikipedia.

I believe that pretty much covers all the car regulations for the current NASCAR cars, which are known at CoTs (Car of Tomorrows). They're pretty much incredibly safe cars the make sure no driver deaths occur. I believe F1 has a bunch of regulations concerning safety as well.


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Car_of_Tomorrow
 
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racinhard

New Member
Mar 18, 2013
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#4
The best thing that I can recommend is to go to a race in person if you can. Its a completely different experience in person than on TV.
Xun0401, NASCAR now has whats known as the Gen6 car. NASCAR doesn't run the COTs anymore. They just released the Gen6 car this year and every car looks like a production Ford, Chevy, or Toyota. There are a lot of rules in NASCAR but most of them make the sport more competitive. You can go to www.nascar.com and learn about the current affairs going on in NASCAR and even some history via past articles. NASCAR is probably the most watched racing in the USA, and a sport that competes with Football for viewers and attendees.

John
RacinHard
 
Likes: Xun0401
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Xun0401

New Member
Mar 25, 2013
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#5
Well look at me, I'm quite the outdated person! Haha! Thanks a bunch for the information, racinhard. Honestly speaking, I think the largest reason why NASCAR is such a big sport is because of the car crashes that people want to see. Obviously none of us watch it for that reason, but I think a lot of other people watch it because of that. What gets me most excited about NASCAR is the fact that every car has the exact same specs. So drivers are forced to rely on pure skill and tuning.
 
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bazzie89

New Member
Mar 26, 2013
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#6
Yeah, I too am from Europe and do not really get to see much NASCAR, was that where that Guy got killed in the last year or so in a horror crash? Xun0401, what you say about watching moto sport, be it NASCAR, F1, F3 whatever I have to admit that there is always a bit of me that wants the excitement of the cars colliding, It's not like I would ever want to see the drivers getting hurt, I guess it's just for the excitement level. Sounds a bit grim really but then I guess sport is all about how much adrenaline it can produce.
 
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Xun0401

New Member
Mar 25, 2013
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#8
Yeah, I too am from Europe and do not really get to see much NASCAR, was that where that Guy got killed in the last year or so in a horror crash? Xun0401, what you say about watching moto sport, be it NASCAR, F1, F3 whatever I have to admit that there is always a bit of me that wants the excitement of the cars colliding, It's not like I would ever want to see the drivers getting hurt, I guess it's just for the excitement level. Sounds a bit grim really but then I guess sport is all about how much adrenaline it can produce.
Yes, I guess everybody feels the excitement when collisions happen. After all, what is more fun than watching a car accident that you get to see? It's not like driving in heavy traffic and then you see the aftermath of the collision. The viewers get to see a collision happening in real time (and possibly slow motion). I think it's exciting whether you're a casual viewer or a hardcore fan. In fact, I can hear the "Oh!"s going around whenever a collision occurs.
 
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Mar 25, 2013
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#9
LOL. It is sad but true. Everyone loves it when someone crashes. It is a very bad place that we live live in. Car explodes and someones dying and we are cheering and yelling.
 
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fourmatic

New Member
Mar 29, 2013
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#11
I, much like OP, am new to NASCAR and have a F1 fan background. The thing that got me more interested in NASCAR was watching Lewis Hamilton and Tony Stewart switch cars for a day at the track. I was nice hearing them both praise the difficulty of driving in the other guys respective car. NASCAR takes a lot of crap but its never from true fans. I think talking about it here will be a good step towards getting into it. Oh and watch some races, and pick a driver to root for.
 
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riku517

New Member
Mar 31, 2013
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#12
I agree with racinhard, NASCAR can look pretty boring on TV (especially if there is no crashes). When watching a race in person, you hear and smell the cars. It makes the race much more enjoyable when you're there seeing the racers work hard to win!
 
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fourmatic

New Member
Mar 29, 2013
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#13
Yeah riku517, no doubt. Going to see a race live is 100x more awesome that watching it on TV. But that goes for most sporting events. I feel NASCAR is one of the harder racing sports to get big into only watching it on the TV. If you have the means and live close enough, treat yourself and head to a live race, you wont regret it.
 
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Mar 27, 2013
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#14
So how many races in a season, and how are the teams made up 2 drivers, 2 cars per team. Are all the tracks the same shape?
Each season has 36 races, plus 3 non-championship ones.

The teams are a bit inconsistent. Some have 4 cars, some have 2, some have 1. Not to mention teams that only race in some races, usually the bigger ones. There are 3 manufacturers: Ford, Chevrolet and Toyota.

As for the tracks, they are all different shapes. The most common kind is the 1.5 miles tri-oval shaped track, but there are tracks with 4 corners (Indianapolis), triangular tracks such as Pocono and typical road courses like Watkins Glen.
 
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Apr 1, 2013
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#16
To get some idea about stock car racing look for a short track near you dirt or paved and go watch. Just about everywhere in the states and about every Saturday night there is short track racing some place near you. Here in south Texas there is racing this weekend in Corpus Christi, Goliad and Kyle. Corpus and Goliad are dirt tracks and Centrel Texas Speedway in Kyle as asphault.
 
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vroomvroom

New Member
Apr 2, 2013
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#17
What's the difference? I mean, I know the difference between dirt and asphalt, but as someone who knows a bit more, what are the intricacies that go into both? A driver learning on concrete, what are they going to have to know or change about their style hopping on a dirt track?
 
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Mar 27, 2013
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#18
Cars on dirt tracks are more loose and hard to control, which makes them a bit more unpredictable in a racing situations. Of course it has means that settings and tyres are different.